Archive for People

Testing the Limits

Testing-the-Limits

When you master a skill, it can appear simple, almost effortless—but that’s just an illusion. Mastery takes hard work and dedication. This week, Webtech Wireless salutes our very own firmware engineer, Alireza Nematollahi (Ali), who’s been pulling in the gold as national kayaking champion while working to ensure Webtech Wireless hardware products are put through tests of their own.

Ali Tests the Limits

Ali works on hardware engineering projects at Webtech Wireless, either involved with new deployments or redesigning existing products and processes for increased efficiency. “Currently, I’m redesigning the automated testing hardware to improve how we test our locators”, he says and then explains that locators were tested manually, but “due to complexity of the locators, they are not human testable in a timely manner. By automating the testing, it will be possible to test up to 24 locators simultaneously.”

My impression of a slow hands-on testing process replaced by a faceless machine is dashed by Ali’s description of the rigorous test procedures in automated testing. Automation is more than just hurrying up (although that certainly is one aim). Automated testing improves how Quality Assurance analyzes the test data through improved reporting, and by analyzing the reports, they can continuously improve testing.

“I Will Be Fast!”

Ali has won a dozen or so medals over the years competing as a flatwater kayaker, and he credits his success in part to having “the best coach ever”.  Six days a week, you can find Ali training, either on his own in the gym or on the water with Kamini Jain, a two-time Olympian. Her motto, “I will be fast!”, must be what inspires Ali to say things such as, “You can do whatever you want”, and “I can be successful at my job and I can be successful at my sport”.

Overcoming Adversity

Although he’s not a professional, Ali has competed and won against the best in the field. He won the men’s gold medal at the national finals in Regina and won gold in Seattle’s Ted Houk Regatta K4, but is still content to have placed seventh this year in Montreal. “Does it seem like a failure to only place seventh after winning gold”, I asked, but Ali’s answer is a case in point of what a winning attitude is all about. “It’s not a failure. Seventh is very good, and failure is what motivates me to do better”.

On adversity he says, “I don’t let myself get caught up in comparison with others or my earlier successes. Comparison will tear me apart from the inside. I’m always thinking about the next regatta and the next year.” Then he adds, “Failure motivates you to do better.”

It’s pretty clear from talking to Ali that his training has prepared him for all the tests that life can offer, both at work and on the water. Congratulations for being an inspiration.

TMW Transforum – Five Strategies for Success

TMW-Transforum_13

This year’s TMW Transforum was held at the Anaheim Convention Center in southern California and, as an opportunity to showcase TMW’s suites of fleet management software, it brought together TMW experts, partners, vendors, and prospects. Having helped several of our clients integrate their TMW products with our award-winning Quadrant fleet management solution means that we’ve always have an invested interest in exhibiting at the TMW Transforum over the years.

This year, TMW took the unusual decision to invite one of the great American screen actors of all time, Robert Duvall, to the TransForum stage for lunchtime chat entitled, “A Conversation with Robert Duvall”. For anyone who thinks trade shows are same old, same old, Robert Duvall, veteran actor brought an air of greatness to the event.

Robert Duvall, Award-Winning Actor, Director and Producer, is known for a string of legendary roles including Major Frank Burns, MASH; Tom Hagen, The Godfather; Boo Radley, One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest; Lt. Col. Kilgore, Apocalypse Now; and revered by Texans for his role as Ranger Gus McCrae in The Lonesome Dove.

Duvall was interviewed by David Wangler, TMW Systems President. While Wrangler read from a prepared script, Duvall, like any good actor, answered spontaneously and extemporaneously. When Wangler asked Duvall about his early days driving trucks to support his early acting career in New York, Duvall quipped, “I did? Who does your research?” Despite Duvall’s casual style and dubious credentials as a trucker, what transpired over the hour-long chat was his winning attitude that can be applied to any field of endeavor.

Out of his talk, I pulled together Robert Duvall’s five strategies for Success:

  1. Do your research. From roles as diverse as Joseph Stalin to a US Marine, Duvall meticulous researched the characters, their times, and their environments to ensure he brought the characters to life in three dimensions.
  2. “Hobbies, hobbies, hobbies” – Throughout Duvall’s life he has always cultivated hobbies, most notably his passion for tango dancing. Hobbies point to his inner curiosity about life—at 82, Duvall is still willing to learn new things.
  3. Acknowledge everyone you work with. Time and time again, Duvall acknowledged the people he’d worked with from famous directors and lowly grips.
  4. Laugh – atmosphere is worth a lot. Duvall described the pranks and general hilarity on the set of MASH and how much it helped them work as a team—especially when there was stress.
  5. Trust the process. Although he starred in many, many films, there are many others he turned down. In his chat, he made a point of describing how he’d turn down a role that wasn’t right for him (or not right at the time), while trusting that the right role would fill the vacancy. His accomplishments now speak for themselves and  to acknowledge his inspiring message.

In the end, what made the delighted crowd of sponsors, exhibitors, and fleet managers jump to their feet, was to be in the presence of Robert Duvall is to witness how infectious optimism can be. In his own words, “If you make plans, something will come from around the corner and surprise you”.

 

Don’t Gamble on Distracted Driving

By Joel Waithman

WEW-Booth

Walt Fischer and Nigel Maund man the new Webtech Wireless booth at NAFA 2013.

 

Last week, along with Nigel Maund, Walt Fischer and others from Webtech Wireless, I attended NAFA in Atlantic City, New Jersey. I’m sure it’s a fun place in the summer, but in April there wasn’t much to distract me from the trade show (except perhaps a visit to the roulette table).

While at the conference, I attended an excellent presentation called, “Breakthrough Technologies and Future Trends for Fleet Telematics”, which described how telematics is going to impact fleet management in the next few years. The format of the presentation was a panel of four telematics specialists (responsible for huge fleets such as ARI) and a moderator. They fielded about ten questions and spent about ten minutes answering each question, except for one: The big question on everyone’s mind was distracted driving. This topic consumed a whole hour of the presentation time with many people from both commercial and government fleets weighing in on different points. Questions included, “How can we solve it?”, “Are we invading the privacy of the driver?”, and “What applications are available?”

So, gambling may be a fine distraction in Atlantic City, but no one’s gambling on distracted driving. One commenter compared cell phone use while driving to gun ownership. After all, a vehicle is potentially as lethal to operate, so some form of regulation is needed to ensure people use it properly. But is it the responsibility of governments to enforce? Some government operators suggested that unions might resist (unless required to comply by government regulations) while others embraced the idea (particularly commercial operators who shoulder a great deal of responsibility regardless of whether cell phones are used for private or company purposes). Everyone was aware of the Coca-Cola settlement of last year that set a precedent across the board for companies to monitor their drivers’ cell phone habits more closely.

On a lighter note, this year AT&T set up a demo car on the trade show floor equipped to demonstrate the risks of distracted driving. To try it, we put on special goggles that simulated a driver’s view and then we were given a cell phone to type on while driving. The demo could measure our level of distraction using graphs that measured speed fluctuations as we texted. People who tried the simulation were surprised by how distracted they became.

Joel Waithman

Joel Waithman, Channel Partner Manager - Webtech Wireless

These experiences reminded me how critical our Webtech Wireless MDTs with hands-free voice are to preventing distracted driving. Even our auditory alert warnings (such as on the Accelerometer) to warn of excess speed, braking, and other erratic driving behavior ensure safety by keeping drivers focused on driving rather than texting. There are many ways to be distracted nowadays, but it’s in no one’s interest to gamble on road safety.

Winter Fleets—Let’s Celebrate!

This winter, thousands of locals and visitors alike will don their skates and glide effortlessly along the Rideau Canal Skateway, a highlight of winter in Ottawa and the world’s longest skating rink. At 7.8 kilometres long, the Rideau Canal is also a UNESCO World Heritage Site, but it’s best known as a winter wonderland as it wends its way from the steps of Canada’s majestic parliament buildings through the heart of downtown Ottawa and finally winds up at Dows Lake skating rink.

Unlike many cities, Ottawa comes to life in the winter when the frozen canal becomes the focus of winter festivities such as its Christmas Lights across Canada, featuring over 300,000 multi-coloured lights, and its popular Winterlude, held in February, make Ottawa a winter destination. For most city Public Works departments, winter is the time to prevent streets from becoming the world’s longest skating rink. But Ottawa’s got that handled too.

In 2009, The City of Ottawa implemented the Webtech Wireless InterFleet winter operations solution for government fleets, because it supports an extensive array of sensor integrations (road temperature sensors, spreader controllers, plow sensors) and boasts ten-second reporting and turn-by-turn navigation. With InterFleet, it gained visibility into how much salt its third-party contractors were using and with that came the ability to identify excess salt. Not surprisingly, by reducing excess salt usage, the City reduced its salt costs by 20%.

“Installing GPS technology in our salt spreader vehicles is a great way to help us reduce the amount of road salt we use, and reduce costs at the same time,” said Mayor Larry O’Brien, “By installing these systems, we will both prolong the life of City infrastructure and keep more money in the pockets of Ottawa taxpayers.”

Due to its negative impact on the environment, particularly drinking water supplies, the City of Ottawa actively encourages residents and snow removal contractors to reduce the rock salt they use. Ottawa’s Public Works Department is always looking for innovative means to reduce salt usage and it found GPS technology linked to its electronic salt spreader controllers to be one of the most effective ways to track salt usage. It actively promotes the Smart About Salt Council to increase awareness about eliminating rock salt and using resources more effectively.

Ten-second real-time reporting provides supervisors with the information they need to handle winter effectively. No matter where they are—the office, home, or vehicle—supervisors can respond immediately to events as they unfold, confident that the information they are looking at in their InterFleet solution is completely accurate and up to date.

So, when the temperature drops this winter, it’s time to celebrate!

Check the skating conditions on the Rideau Canal Skateway.

Find out more great ideas about things to see and do when you visit Ottawa and Gatineau this winter at Canada’s Capital Region!

Photos courtesy of National Capital Commission

Drawing Intelligence from Data

Huckabee addresses the TMW Transforum 2012

For anyone who saw the irreverent film, Freakonomics (“the hidden side of everything”), knows that we’re now collecting data on a vast scale. The stories that are emerging from all this data are remarkable. Who knew that, with this accumulation of data, we could prove Sumo wrestlers were cheating or that the reasons politicians cited for falling crime rates were wrong?

At the TMW 2012 Transforum this week in Orlando (attended by 1,700 vendors and customers), a key theme was, “how do we draw intelligence from data?” According to TMW Senior Project Manager, Michael Malecha in his session on business improvement, “We have 86% more data than even just two years ago, but how do we draw meaning from it?” He also stated that 93% of CEOs believe they are losing opportunities from a lack of tools to handle this data.

Since all data sets contain noise, the secret is in discerning the noise from the signal. The signal, of course, refers to meaningful trends.

His cautionary message is simple:

  • If we treat noise as a signal, we spin our wheels;
  • If we treat signal as noise, we miss opportunities.

Arkansas Governor Mike Huckabee (speaking neither as politician nor as pastor and pictured above) decried the state of personal accountability when he said, “We’ve created a monster”. Sometimes, the gathering of data can be seen as a monster—Big Brother tracking our every move. But business intelligence (knowing how to draw meaningful conclusions from information), serves the needs of small to medium companies just as it does large—if they know what to do with it.

In order to optimize fleet operations and enhance financial performance, fleet managers often turn to automation. Initially, the desire is for dot-on-a-map visibility of their vehicles. Using GPS/AVL technology, they collect location and sometimes diagnostic data in real-time. As the data accumulates, managers may want to report on it, such as exception reporting to filter out only data that doesn’t conform to expected norms. Data then starts to fulfill a more complex need: analyzing trends to facilitate better cost projections (such as optimizing fuel usage), and route planning. Finally, with data streaming in from multiple third-party sources, they can integrate information to discover complex relationships between external events and internal actions.  This is the essence of business intelligence.

TMW CEO, David Wangler, in the general session keynote speech emphasized this point when he said, “It’s no longer the big who eat the small, but the fast who eat the slow”. In other words, becoming leaner and more efficient enables us to outmanoeuver the competition. Your GPS/AVL fleet tracking solution is sending you real-time data that not only provides you with visibility here and now, but down the road, will enable you to see trends and anticipate opportunities.

Perhaps as a fitting representation of the need to draw intelligence from data, the TMW awards gala was warmed up by Jean Francois, the Quebec-based visual artists who drew fantastical pictures for everyone while dinner was served. Accompanied by pulsing rock music, the images appeared abstract and confusing at first until he ceremoniously turned them over (new right-side up) and delighted everyone with images of the Statue of Liberty and a long-haul truck.

Jean-Francois-TMW-WEW

Going Down the Road with Terry Fox

Webtech Wireless Remembers Terry FoxIn 1912, when Thomas Wilby set out from Halifax, Nova Scotia in his four-cylinder REO Special bound for Canada’s distant west coast, he knew his arrival in Victoria, British Columbia would mark the first time anyone successfully crossed Canada by automobile. It took two months. Last week, across Canada (and around the world), runners laced up and prepared to pay respect for another great Canadian, Terry Fox. Webtech Wireless employees also took part in the Terry Fox Run, a run that in some ways also commemorates transportation in Canada. This is the story of a Canadian hero and legend who joined a nation in his Marathon of Hope—to find a cure cancer.

Owing to its geographical size (second only to Russia), Canada has historically been challenged to provide a high level of communications to a relatively small population spread across a vast land. This is the reason highways were so important to Canada’s emergence as a leader in the post-war period.  Like the Federal-Aid Highway Act in the United States, Canada’s Trans-Canada Highway Act paved the way to build the transportation infrastructure needed to move the bounty of natural resources to waiting ports and to move people—including new immigrants—around a continent untouched by war.

But unlike the United States, Canada has always been a one-highway nation and that highway is the Trans-Canada Highway stretching 7,821 kilometres (4,859 miles) from St. John’s, Newfoundland in the east to Victoria, British Columbia in the west. It is this highway that 22-year-old Terry Fox set out to conquer and set the stage for conquering cancer too. In 1980 with little initial fanfare, he aimed west with his skip-hop-run that would later became his signature (he’d already lost his right leg to cancer) he began his long journey. Sometimes, it’s said that his journey was cut short by a return of the cancer that eventually killed him, but when he was forced to stop near Thunder Bay, Ontario, he had completed 5,373 kilometres (3,339 miles) of his journey. That’s almost two Tour de Frances or 1½ times across Australia.

Webtech-Wireless-Teams Terry Fox run 2012

With a total of 17 runners, the two Canadian Webtech Wireless offices (Webtrekkers) ran in Toronto’s High Park and Vancouver’s Stanley Park to raise a total $5,496.62 for the Terry Fox Foundation. Congratulations to all.

City of Vaughan Embraces a Four Seasons Solution

Once just a small town with a vision, the City of Vaughan is growing fast. Located north of Toronto, current projections show that its population is expected to almost double by 2030. For the City of Vaughan to keep up with growth in this region of overlapping jurisdictional responsibilities, it must find ways to get the most out of its technology investment.

According to Shawn McKenzie, Senior Engineering Assistant at Public Works, “It’s a barrel of monkeys for residents to understand and to many residents, anyone with a plow blade is a City truck,” so Public Works must manage public perception as well as public roadways. In the future, the ability to share data among different jurisdictions will increasingly clarify public perceptions of who’s doing what.

Recently, Public Works mandated that its third-party contractors use GPS/AVL Locators, thereby enabling it to track how efficiently both its primary suburban and secondary rural roads are maintained across different seasons. This decision keeps contractors accountable and citizens content. As proof of reduced complaints, its initial Webtech Wireless deployment calling for a “Where’s my Plow?” Web site and Call Centre, became so efficient that as calls dropped away, it eliminated the need for a Call Centre altogether.

Today, the City of Vaughan has realized the great opportunity that is intrinsic in a GPS/AVL solution and, with hundreds of vehicles now equipped and reporting, the word is spreading. The City of Vaughan’s Parks Board (with a fleet of sidewalk plows), has just adopted a Webtech Wireless solution for its vehicles too.

“When we make appointments to send our water trucks to an address and the client isn’t there, the driver needs to move on to the next appointment. If someone claims the water truck never came, we can prove the site call was made.”
— Shawn McKenzie, Public Works, City of Vaughan

The Seven Habits of Highly Effective Fleets

The Seven Habits of Highly Effective Fleets

Sad news last week with the passing of author Stephen Covey. Around the world, people in decision-making positions have taken cues from his writings and seminars to increase their productivity, happiness, and of course, success of their companies. To honor Mr. Covey, and be true to the intent of this blog (keep our finger on the pulse of AVL/GPS technologies for fleet management), we’d like to revisit his The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People through the eyes of well-deployed fleet management solutions.

1. Be Proactive—Take risks and accept new challenges to achieve goals.

Steve Troyer of Troyer Ventures, an oil and gas service provider, recognized early on the need for a comprehensive solution to solve the paper jam—from dispatch to journey management. Even while many companies remained reluctant to adapt and change, Steve had a vision to lead in technology integration and set a standard for the industry.

“Our ability to provide efficient services allows us to continue to grow the industry in our community, and that means more jobs. When the company is strong we can grow. That just makes sense” —Steve Troyer, Owner, Troyer Ventures

2. Begin with the End in Mind—Bring projects to completion and unite teams and organizations under a shared vision, mission, and purpose.

Thousands of customers benefit from our solutions. In each case, a customer starts with a specific goal in mind—reducing fuel economy, improving vehicles and driver performance, or mitigating risks—each implementation has specific organizational or business goals that our customers want to achieve.

“By installing these systems, we will both prolong the life of City infrastructure and keep more money in the pockets of Ottawa taxpayers.”
—Mayor Larry O’Brien, City of Ottawa

3. Put First Things First—Getting the most important things done first encourages direct effectiveness

Each telematics deployment comes with unique challenges. Our proven pilot process has demonstrated time and again that getting all the pieces of the puzzle in place before a major roll out is the first step in getting to the end goal of solving your challenges with an automated GPS/AVL solution.

“The training was very comprehensive and the Webtech team has really put together a program for all levels of a corporate structure. I definitely would recommend the Webtech training program.”
—Tim Margetts (M. Ed), Director of Safety Canadian Freightways

4. Think Win/Win—Seeking mutual benefit increases group momentum

Reducing salt usage is good for the environment and fits well with municipal, provincial, and state cost saving efforts. The City of Ottawa implemented the Webtech Wireless winter operations solution for government fleets. By gaining the ability to identify excess salt usage by its contractors, the City reduced its salt costs by 20%.

“We cannot keep trading short-term cost for long-term cost.”
—City of Ottawa

5. Seek First to Understand, Then to Be Understood—Listening first helps you understand problems, resulting in targeted solutions.

In order to be fair to all drivers, management at Tennessee-based Dement Construction mounted a large TV screen in the office. Running our Quadrant Manager and refreshed once a minute, vehicles show up in real-time on the monitor in a highly public space.

“Trucks get there and back a lot faster. Everyone knows that they are visible on the map and every person is equally accountable for where they are.”
—Drew Newmon, Office Manager, Dement Construction

6. Synergize—Leverage the diversity of individuals to increase levels of success.

Webtech Wireless has the most experienced people in the telematics business. We started in 1999 and are pioneers in developing, deploying, and supporting telematics technology. Every time we work with an existing or new customer, we seek ways to collaborate with your teams to create a solution that will work for you in your environment with your vehicles and drivers.

“Webtech Wireless brings a sense of partnership and flexibility to handling multiple challenges.”
—Steve Gaston, Information Services Manager, Sierra Pacific Industries

7. Sharpen the Saw—Implement continuous improvements and safeguards against “burnout” and subsequent non-productivity.

For Sierra Pacific Industries, information services manager, Steve Gaston estimates that their drivers were wasting twenty minutes of overtime a day filling out paperwork. With a Webtech Wireless solution, they saved $300,000 per year (based on 225 drivers working 200 days per year) in overtime. Individually for the drivers, there was an unseen benefit to the changes too:

“Our drivers get to go home [earlier] and see their spouses and kids.” –Steve Gaston

Mr. Covey was injured in a bicycle accident in April of this year, and last week succumbed to his injuries. He will be missed, yet his legacy lives on.

In memoriam, Stephen Covey, 1932 – 2012

Leaner, Greener Operations Saves Costs for Fleets

It may be a while before our roads witness emission-free trucking fleets running on solar and battery power. In the meantime, fleet managers are discovering that if they take steps to green their fleet by implementing telematics and automated vehicle location (AVL) solutions, they’ll not only reduce carbon emissions, but they’ll also save a lot of money.

Here are some snapshots of how different companies are saving both the environment around them and fuel wastage:

The City of Columbia, Missouri is reducing operating costs by letting fleet managers monitor idling, speeding, harsh braking, sharp acceleration and engine over-revving. This helps their drivers develop long-term best practices to decrease fuel consumption significantly and thereby reduce carbon dioxide emissions.

“Our director instructed us not to let the drivers sit in trucks with air conditioners running. Now we know our trucks are not running up and down the road as much. Drivers are where they are supposed to be and working where they are supposed to be—at all times—so it makes it a lot easier for us to track.”

— Sam Thomas, City of Columbia Street Superintendent

Cascade Sierra Solutions is committed to helping trucking companies green their fleets and one way their doing it is by helping them navigate their way through applying for grants and loans to purchase energy-efficient newer trucks. Newer vehicles are more efficient and those savings mean they can expect a quick return on their investment

Loans are available, and a number of public agencies, such as the Port of Tacoma and agencies in California, provide grants to help truckers upgrade. Cascade Sierra Solutions. “We help them with all the paperwork,” Banks said, “and it can be a lot of paperwork the average guy doesn’t have the skill set to fill out.”

“Truckers doing their part for the environment with the help of Cascade Sierra Solutions!”

—Cascade Sierra Solutions website

Cascade Sierra installs Webtech Wireless GPS units in each vehicle, connected directly to the truck’s engine management system. The Webtech Wireless units report truck location, speed, fuel consumption, and much more over the AT&T Mobile Network. These reports give Cascade Sierra the data needed to ensure funders, truck owners, and pollution control agencies trucks are being used as required, and goals are being met.

Webtech Wireless’ NextBus division, is also providing clear incentives for people to take more sustainable and environmentally friendly transportation options. Cities throughout North America are luring people out of their cars and onto public transportation by implementing the Nextbus solution to let riders know in real-time when the next transit vehicle will arrive.

For example, NextBus technology was deployed on 60 buses in the Canadian Maritime city of Saint John, New Brunswick. Because riders know when the bus is arriving, they spend less time waiting and therefore there’s more incentive to leave their CO2 emitting vehicles at home. The environmental value of a NextBus implementation, when coupled with a transit authority’s switch to bio and electric vehicles is profound for each city that implements it.

“The Government of Canada is proud to invest in modern technologies that are both efficient and environmentally responsible.”

—Member of Parliament for Saint John, Rodney Weston.

Oil and Gas Safety: What’s Working/ What’s Not

IrtizaIrtiza Zaidi is the Product Marketing Manager at Webtech Wireless.  He works closely with the safety professionals in many companies in the oil patch.

Recently, he attended the Petroleum Safety Conference—billed as “Canada’s premiere oil and gas safety conference and tradeshow”—in Banff, Alberta, for a few days to learn more about safety concerns in the oil and gas industry.

Below are his latest discoveries about the Conference and safety professionals.


Irtiza Zaidi: “Before I dive into the meat and potatoes, I wanted to share some insight into the safety profession and the folks I interacted with. I went to one breakout session led by Imperial Oil, which was quite an eye opener. The purpose was to describe the risks that safety professionals take every day on the job and how they deal with them. The idea is that, before we can start preaching to others, let’s evaluate ourselves first.

Now the view I had of safety folks was they were risk averse by-the-book people. They worked Monday to Friday and in their off time did everything possible to avoid risk. They would never cross a yellow light while driving nor would they park without paying. Well, was I was in for a shock!

We had some safety people talking about how they chased storms in Alberta. Winter storms, rain storms, blizzards, and how they had been doing this for 15 years. Another safety person talked about how they wore helmets on their motorcycles while travelling at speeds of 120 on the Canadian highways, but once they got to the US, the helmets came off. Or the safety person who jumped between moving boats in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean while it was raining, so she could help out with a lobster catch.

The presentations I attended were delivered well and the topics of immense importance. Colonel Mark Trostel, Driving Safety Advisor with Encana, presented, Driving Safety: Enhancing Performance, Reducing Exposure, in which he described some of the challenges of using in-cab audible feedback (such as buzzers and beeps), to try to change driver behaviour. He provided helpful statistical information as well as first-hand knowledge of the affect alerts have on drivers.

Here are some statistics shared in this presentation:

40% of all fatalities in the energy industry occur in vehicles

Leading indicators of crashes

–          Excessive Braking, following too closely, distracted driving

–          Rapid starts and aggressive or reckless driving

–          Habitual speeding dramatically increases risk and severity of accidents

–          Frequent Lateral “Gs” are precursors to a rollover crash

Encana’s AVL program for its light-duty vehicles provides

–          Driver scorecards that were emailed to the driver each week

–          Supervisors with the ability to review their drivers’ driving habits

What worked?

–          Providing drivers with feedback about their performance on a weekly basis

–          Providing incentives to drivers with good behavior worked

–          Having drivers compare themselves with their peers led to the drivers creating their own “Top 100 Club”

What didn’t work?

–          Driver feedback by way of audible tones or flashing lights only lasted three weeks before the drivers went back to their old driving patterns.”

“Safe Driving Programs – Why Should I Care?” by Colonel Mark Trostel, EnCana in 2010