Archive for Corporate Bloggery

Testing the Limits

Testing-the-Limits

When you master a skill, it can appear simple, almost effortless—but that’s just an illusion. Mastery takes hard work and dedication. This week, Webtech Wireless salutes our very own firmware engineer, Alireza Nematollahi (Ali), who’s been pulling in the gold as national kayaking champion while working to ensure Webtech Wireless hardware products are put through tests of their own.

Ali Tests the Limits

Ali works on hardware engineering projects at Webtech Wireless, either involved with new deployments or redesigning existing products and processes for increased efficiency. “Currently, I’m redesigning the automated testing hardware to improve how we test our locators”, he says and then explains that locators were tested manually, but “due to complexity of the locators, they are not human testable in a timely manner. By automating the testing, it will be possible to test up to 24 locators simultaneously.”

My impression of a slow hands-on testing process replaced by a faceless machine is dashed by Ali’s description of the rigorous test procedures in automated testing. Automation is more than just hurrying up (although that certainly is one aim). Automated testing improves how Quality Assurance analyzes the test data through improved reporting, and by analyzing the reports, they can continuously improve testing.

“I Will Be Fast!”

Ali has won a dozen or so medals over the years competing as a flatwater kayaker, and he credits his success in part to having “the best coach ever”.  Six days a week, you can find Ali training, either on his own in the gym or on the water with Kamini Jain, a two-time Olympian. Her motto, “I will be fast!”, must be what inspires Ali to say things such as, “You can do whatever you want”, and “I can be successful at my job and I can be successful at my sport”.

Overcoming Adversity

Although he’s not a professional, Ali has competed and won against the best in the field. He won the men’s gold medal at the national finals in Regina and won gold in Seattle’s Ted Houk Regatta K4, but is still content to have placed seventh this year in Montreal. “Does it seem like a failure to only place seventh after winning gold”, I asked, but Ali’s answer is a case in point of what a winning attitude is all about. “It’s not a failure. Seventh is very good, and failure is what motivates me to do better”.

On adversity he says, “I don’t let myself get caught up in comparison with others or my earlier successes. Comparison will tear me apart from the inside. I’m always thinking about the next regatta and the next year.” Then he adds, “Failure motivates you to do better.”

It’s pretty clear from talking to Ali that his training has prepared him for all the tests that life can offer, both at work and on the water. Congratulations for being an inspiration.

Testing Technology: The Key to Top-Quality Fleet Management Solutions

 

WEW-QA_Time-Machine As a pioneer in automated GPS location-based technology at Webtech Wireless we design our own hardware and software solutions. This provides us with the necessary control to build and deliver the solutions our customers rely on. In order to ensure our products are secure, reliable, and robust enough to outlast diverse road conditions and meet industry standards for heavy-duty vehicle applications, the key to our success, (we have delivered hundreds of thousands of Locators that process millions of transactions a day), comes down to one thing—TESTING.

We hire the best network operations and engineers available in the industry and it’s on their shoulders to ensure our GPS fleet tracking solutions keep working around the clock every day of the year. I dropped into our testing area to find out more about why it is that Webtech Wireless is indeed an end-to-end solution for fleet GPS tracking.

Quality Assurance Means Testing, Testing, Testing

Sarkis Teghararian, Manager of Hardware Engineering provided me with an excellent overview of the facility while Kevin Lockwood, Hardware Engineer, continued testing Locators in the background, occasionally adding valuable commentary to my questions.

 

WEW-QA_Kevin-Sarkis

As we entered the work area Sarkis explained, “We develop and test all our products and increasingly we test third-party products as well. Depending on the needs, complexity, and phase of the project, testing is done either in-house or outsourced to other testing labs” Testing equipment is arranged in a series of stations, each dominated by some device I would later learn has a specific testing role to play. Before I could learn more about all these cool testing stations (and about the intriguing command module-like chamber in the corner), I first needed a quick lesson in quality assurance.

A Quality Assurance Primer

Depending on the needs, there are different types of testing. For example, derivative testing verifies only changes to a product, pre-qualification testing ensures a prototype will stand up to its design specifications, and regression testing validates new features including their impact on pre-existing components (i.e., it tests that new features don’t compromise the old ones).

In addition, I needed to know that there are two distinct phases of testing:

  • Development testing to validate new designs
  • Manufacturing testing to validate that manufactured units are built according to specifications

Testing for an End-to-end Solution

When testing gets to the manufacturing QA phase (ensuring manufactured quality) it’s tested differently. With the design already verified, testing becomes more granular, “but” insists Kevin peering up for one of the WT 5130 Locators, “each and every unit is tested”. Because each unit must be tested individually, testing is to a large extent automated. “Some components are manufactured in China”, continues Kevin, “and some locally, so we test to ensure all are manufacturers are building according to specifications.”

A key component of Webtech Wireless’ offerings is end-to-end solutions, but what does that mean for quality assurance? The answer is system testing. Units aren’t just tested by themselves, but also as they relate to a custom-designed solution for a specific client. So, a Locator that’s tested for compliance with manufacturing specifications is also tested with Webtech Wireless software and then again with an EOBR (electronic onboard recorder) such as the MDT 3100 to ensure they work in concert.

Enter the Time Machine

WEW-QA_Enter-the-Time-Machine

Sarkis refers to it wryly as the “Time Machine”, but it’s no joke—on closer inspection, I see that it is in fact branded officially as the GTEM ETS Time Machine. Before my imagination can run too wild, Sarkis brings me back patiently explaining that this machine tests the long-term effects of radiation from GPS and cellular transmissions. During the design phase, for example, a new Locator is placed into the time machine, which tests that its design is solid. The machine is able to speed up the exposure rates and thus reduces both the time it takes to test, and also the cost of testing. Among other criteria, the Locator is tested against its radio frequency rates, how well its circuitry responds, and how well it is able to communicate wirelessly with the base station.

Future Proofing

Quality Assurance is about “continuous improvement”, asserts Sarkis who cites the development of a new audio/acoustic booth to the roster as well as empirical testing to increase the precision of testing. In the future, we also plan to increase the testing of third-party integrations and products. All of this so that we can deliver the incredible reliability that our customers expect of us in a GPS/AVL solution that customers trust to make decisions with every minute of every day.

Webtech Wireless Taking off with Airports

Webtech-Wireless-Taking-off-with-AirportsWith summer winding down and kids going back to school, most people are thinking beyond holidays. At Webtech Wireless, we’re ramping up for a busy season of fleet management trade shows and conventions, and that means we’re spending lots of time in airports getting to and from these events.

Airports tend to embrace new technologies quickly, especially when the technologies can be shown to reduce cost and improve security. Webtech Wireless has airport security perimeter ground vehicle solutions at several major airports in the United States, including John F. Kennedy, LaGuardia, Massport (Boston), and O’Hare International in Chicago. Here’s what we’re doing in Chicago.

Chicago O’Hare International Airport

The City of Chicago’s O’Hare International Airport is owned and operated by the City of Chicago’s Department of Aviation. As a Webtech Wireless customer since 2003, we provide solutions to many of the City’s 2,500 vehicles (including vehicles in its various public works departments). Our airport solution is used to transmit critical location data from designated City of Chicago vehicles every ten seconds alerting the City of runway incursions and security breaches. We also provide automated vehicle location services (AVL) for its snow removal equipment.

As it is not operationally practical to maintain two-way radio communications between every vehicles and airport operations, GPS/AVL technology helps the City track its vehicles. Also, as the speed limit within the airport security perimeter at O’Hare is 30 miles per hour, our vehicle reports help City fleet managers ensure their vehicles operate within the airport’s speed limit.

On the technical side, our AVL solution is ideal for airport operations, because it’s designed for vehicles operating in an 802.11b coverage area; that is, it uses a point-to-multipoint configuration with an omnidirectional antenna located in a coverage area around the access point.

Fly with Webtech Wireless

Webtech Wireless is flying off to several trade shows this autumn. Follow our Events page, which is updated with new events regularly.

September 5 Snow-N-Ohio Workshop Perrysburg, Ohio
September 13 2012 Iowa Snow Roadeo Des Moines, Iowa
September 16 BC Roadbuilders Association Fall Conference Kelowna, BC
September 20 Snow and Ice Symposium Milton, Ontario
September 21 Truxpo Seminar  – Abbotsford Abbotsford, BC
September 23-26 TMW TransForum Orlando, Florida
September 25-27 Association of Municipal EMS Conference (AMEMSO) Ottawa, Ontario

 

Saint John Transit gets Wireless Upgrade

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Back in February 2010, Webtech Wireless expanded its InterFleet® implementation with the city of Saint John, New Brunswick to include an additional 100 public works and police vehicles—a contract valued at over $100,000. Now to complement the city’s Interfleet solution, Saint John Transit also plans to deploy a Webtech Wireless solution—NextBus.

NextBus will provide Saint John Transit with an AVL tracking solution for its 60 buses, allowing riders to check bus arrivals in real-time. Using PCs, landline phones, cell phones, or SMS text messaging, riders get real-time travel information (each bus is fitted with a satellite tracking system) designed to help them decide whether catching the next bus is a sprint or leisurely stroll. Currently, riders can only view a static schedule of intended bus arrivals and departures on the company’s web site.

NextBus will also install five LCD screens at various locations around the city, including McAllister Place Malland the university campus (UNBSJ) and LED screens at bus stops. To help make public transport more attractive to potential riders (and as a nod to Saint John Transit’s already existing environmental initiatives), the service will add to the city’s existing hot spots with free WIFI for riders on all its buses.

About NextBus

A subsidiary of Webtech Wireless, San Francisco-based NextBus implements real-time passenger information systems used by dozens of transit agencies, universities and other transit operators across North America. Because traffic variations, breakdowns, and day-to-day problems faced by any transit provider can interrupt service, NextBus was designed to help keep riders on schedule even if their buses aren’t. NextBus uses satellite technology and advanced computer modeling to track vehicles on their routes.

As Canada’s oldest incorporated city and New Brunswick’s largest municipality, the city of Saint John has been providing municipal services for more than two centuries. According to Statistics Canada, the Saint John municipal area has a population of 122,389, with a population density of 36.4 persons per square kilometre.

old_saint-john

Historic Saint John has been a transportation hub since long before confederation.

The Port of Saint John is one of Canada’s most important ports (its relatively mild maritime climate keeps its deep-water harbour ice-free year round when inland ports in the St. Lawrence Seaway must contend with ice). This keeps the city’s businesses and industries bustling throughout the year. In 2010 for the first time ever, the Port of Saint John exceeded 30 million metric tonnes of cargo in a single year.

About Saint John Transit

Saint John Transit was established in 1979 to provide scheduled transit service to the city. It replaced City Transit Limited (1948-1979) and a string of others dating back to the People’s Street Railway Company (1869-1876). Saint John Transit is the largest public transit system in the province, both by mileage and passengers.

Saint John Transit Statistics

Saint John Transit’s ridership is approximately 50 percent higher than the average for Canadian cities with a population of between 50,000 and 150,000.

  • Number of vehicles: 60
  • Ridership: 2.5 million riders per year

Current active fleet bus types:

Greening Saint John

To reduce auto emissions, the City of Saint John, along with the Federal and Provincial governments, is investing in public transportation between uptown Saint John and outlying communities. Branded as ComeX (Community Express), it provides a rapid bus transport service during peak commuting times.

Source: Statistics Canada, 2006 Census of Population.

Source: Statistics Canada, 2006 Census of Population.

With the implementation of ComeX, greenhouse gas emissions are projected to drop by 1,500 metric tonnes and downtown traffic will decrease by 800 vehicles a day over the next five years.