Farewell Summer; Hello Adjectives (My Writing: Aug 27 to Sept 3)

I’m considering what it would be like to write entirely without adjectives. I think Strunk & White would approve, but might I become terminally boring?

One of my activities as an editor (with technical writing credentials) is to question what we in marketing call “bumpf”. Bumpf is the motherhood and apple pie that promises everything, cannot be argued with, but ultimately delivers very little. For example, saying “Using our patented XW500 technology will make you happier, bring you the results you deserve, and keep your assets secure,” says nothing at all—it’s bumpf.

Adjectives are like that too. I smile when people overuse words like “amazing”, “fantastic”, and “awesome”. The little voice immediately wants to know how that can be so. “Don’t tell me. Show me.” I don’t suppose my writing is the most sober ever, but I do try to keep my adjectives in check by using them as descriptors of real things. I try to avoid letting them fly about my writing like so many escaped helium balloons…

Here’s my writing for the week. You be the judge:

Webtech WirelessIn Vision, Venture, Velocity (Aug 28, 2012) – I describe three “V”s for Webtech Wireless’ email campaign. I highlight the City of Vaughan’s Public Works department, (which I visited in June), preview the APWA (American Public Works Association) Expo we’re attending, and describe a news story about The fastest road in America, a challenge for those concerned with excess speed on the highways.

 

City of Vaughan Embraces a Four Seasons Solution is a blog post I wrote based on my interview with the Public Works department. It describes how overlap jurisdictions and rapid growth and increasing demand for GPS/AVL technologies.

 

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Approved by WorkSafeBC describes the traumatized dog-sledder who won a claim with WorkSafeBC, but the seven-page report quickly gained the attention of international media for months to follow.

 

How to Save a Few Lives without Breaking A Sweat prepares British Columbians for the news that the Labour Day week-end can bring harsh statistics: more than 575 of us are injured in vehicle accidents on an average Labour Day weekend.