Tag Archive for CP Rail

Finding the Right Fleet GPS for a Livable City

Port Metro Vancouver
Images courtesy of Port Metro Vancouver

Vancouver has always prided itself as a livable city. Year after year, Vancouver tops the list as “world’s most livable city”. One unintended result—stemming from its freeway wars of the 1960s and 70s that put a finish to highway construction—was that the city’s residential streets would find themselves hosting long queues of Port container and long-haul truck traffic.

While Port Metro Vancouver does not operate container trucking companies or container trucks of its own, with 149 privately-owned trucking companies sending over 2,000 trucks to the Port, it has found itself at the diplomatic center of a delicate balance between trucking and city politics.

Last year after Port Metro Vancouver closed its receiving entrance on Clark Drive (a designated truck route), residents quickly noticed a huge increase in container truck traffic on Nanaimo Street (a primarily residential street). With complaints flooding in from constituents, City Hall put pressure on Port Metro Vancouver to do something to reduce this congestion.

In a special pilot program, Port Metro Vancouver equipped 300 container trucks with GPS tracking devices to send information to Port authorities about what routes Port-bound trucks were using. In a recent interview with The Vancouver Sun, Port Metro Vancouver CEO Robin Silvester described the pilot program  as having “already brought results”.

As with CP Rail (another customer of the Port), it vastly improved turnaround time at the Port. “It’s really looking at having a minimal number of trucks in the Lower Mainland,” Sylvester said, adding the Port hopes to reduce the number of trucks leaving without cargo by 30 to 40 per cent. “That would be fantastic. We’re building the tools to move toward that goal.” Based on the improvements in efficiency, the Port is looking to outfit all licensed trucks to its facilities with a GPS solution soon. The program is voluntary and free to licensed trucks serving the Port facilities.

Port Metro VancouverWhile the City of Vancouver is always keen to retain its “most livable city” designation, it also has big incentives to see trucks and commercial vehicles move efficiently.  With over $200-million worth of cargo moving through the port each day, the City must balance the needs of trucks and commercial vehicles positively with the overall health of the city.

The City enforces truck route regulations based on public complaints and safety inspections, but now Port Metro Vancouver can be pro-active. “The GPS (units) will create a system where we’re more pro-active rather than waiting until a community raises a concern”, Silvester said.

Investment in Lean Technology Powers CP’s Success

Despite unusual harsh winter conditions in parts of western North America and a weak valuation of its stock, Canadian Pacific is reporting if first-quarter profits to be far ahead of predictions. Founded in 1881, Canadian Pacific (CP) is one of Canada’s oldest railway companies.

Yesterday’s article in the Vancouver Sun quotes BMO Capital Markets analyst, Fadi Chamoun, “We believe the results also demonstrate that the company has begun to reap the benefits of recent investments in its infrastructure and lean initiatives.” According to the Vancouver Sun, “Chamoun estimated that CP’s operating ratio in the first quarter has improved to the 80-81% range from 90.6 per cent in the first quarter of 2011”.

Part of their commitment to infrastructure and lean initiatives involves the implementation of our Quadrant solution to streamline its InterModal operations (moving freight between trains and CP’s customers). CP benefits from Quadrant in two ways:

  • Save Costs – Rather than CP drivers waiting up to an hour to be dispatched, Quadrant’s In-Cab solution saves time and costs cumulatively over its hundreds of drivers by eliminating the need for mobile phone communication to dispatch drivers.
  • Increase Revenue – By using Quadrant’s geofencing features, CP has identified distribution centres with long stop times. Because CP has a contractual agreement with customers on the maximum amount of wait time at the distribution centre, CP tracks work with customers who are not meeting their contractual obligations and bills them accordingly for excess time.

By investing in its infrastructure and committing to lean initiatives, CP Rail is thriving even in the face of harsh markets and harsh winters.