Tag Archive for Saint John

Everything Passes – Forgetting & Remembering

I have a habit of staring at Facebook just a little too long. I enjoy the jokes,and the concert updates, sometimes the politics, but eventually the full weight of the world’s woes overwhelms me. Take for example the story of how the Saint John City Council greenlighted the destruction of several historic wooden row houses, known locally as the “jellybean houses”.

Even Vancouver developers in their naked lust for property development opportunities would blanch at thought of knocking down such buildings (of course Vancouver’s historic stock barely pre-dates the 1940’s, where Saint John’s jellybean houses survived the Great Fire of 1877). So I’m mourning the loss of heritage and the passage of time.

That’s what I found so compelling about Mark Haney’s Omnis Temporalis performed last night at the Richmond Art GalleryOmnis Temporalis mulls over the transitory nature of life—everything passes—but in a very curious way.

By collaborating with graphic novelist, Seth (aka Gregory Gallant), Haney has set to music George Sprott 1894-1975, a graphic novella that follows the quasi-fictional life of television personality George Sprott.

Photo courtesy Seth

Set in a mid-sized mid-century Canadian city (here fictionalized as “Dominion City”) at a time when the bloom of post-war optimism was beginning to fade, the story maps out the last two weeks of George Sprott’s life, a descent into ignominy parallelling the decline of the city itself.

Photo courtesy Richmond Art Gallery

Photo courtesy Richmond Art Gallery

When I asked Haney how he sourced the music while walking the Camino de Santiago in Spain, he painted a vivid picture of the tiny medieval church along the route where he composed at sunset in the darkening church. What I was really looking for was “How do you conceive of such projects…and execute them?” Or put more crudely, “How did you get off of facebook and make art worthy of a packed hall?”

Photo courtesy Mark Haney

Haney is a thoughtful composer, but even with first-rate singers and musicians, it’s not the music that drives the show. I think about Orpheus’ journey and remember that—in a world so skilled at forgetting—the role of the artist is to make that descent and to come back with something. By drawing together a community and then sustaining the artistic vision over its long gestation period, Haney, Seth (and many others) takes us into our collective memories and then returns us a little richer than had we simply opted to forget.

jellybean-houses

How to Use the NextBus AVL Solution

In our July 21st, 2011 blog post (which coincided with the inauguration of Saint John Transit’s implementation of NextBus), I described the innovation, the need, and the application of Nextbus. Since then, this helpful YouTube video has appeared (courtesy of The City of Saint John, NB) describing how to use Nextbus for finding your next bus when in Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada.

While the Nextbus AVL system is so easy and intuitive to use it hardly needs directions, this video can be helpful if you’re not familiar with computer-based solutions or you would like an overview of how NextBus works from the client end.

NextBus Rolls into Saint John

Saint John Transit bus on King Street soon to be equipped with NextBus AVL solution

Saint John Transit bus on King Street soon to be equipped with NextBus AVL solution

Back in February 2010, Webtech Wireless expanded its InterFleet® implementation with the city of Saint John, New Brunswick to include an additional 100 public works and police vehicles—a contract valued at over $100,000. Now to complement the city’s Interfleet solution, Saint John Transit also plans to deploy a Webtech Wireless solution—NextBus.

NextBus will provide Saint John Transit with an AVL tracking solution for its 60 buses, allowing riders to check bus arrivals in real-time. Using PCs, landline phones, cell phones, or SMS text messaging, riders get real-time travel information (each bus is fitted with a satellite tracking system) designed to help them decide whether catching the next bus is a sprint or leisurely stroll. Currently, riders can only view a static schedule of intended bus arrivals and departures on the company’s web site.

NextBus will also install five LCD screens at various locations around the city, including McAllister Place Mall and the university campus (UNBSJ) and LED screens at bus stops. To help make public transport more attractive to potential riders (and as a nod to Saint John Transit’s already existing environmental initiatives), the service will add to the city’s existing hot spots with free WIFI for riders on all its buses.

About NextBus

A subsidiary of Webtech Wireless, San Francisco-based NextBus implements real-time passenger information systems used by dozens of transit agencies, universities and other transit operators across North America. Because traffic variations, breakdowns, and day-to-day problems faced by any transit provider can interrupt service, NextBus was designed to help keep riders on schedule even if their buses aren’t. NextBus uses satellite technology and advanced computer modeling to track vehicles on their routes.

About Saint John

Historic Saint John has been a transportation hub since long before confederation

Historic Saint John has been a transportation hub since long before confederation

As Canada’s oldest incorporated city and New Brunswick’s largest municipality, the city of Saint John has been providing municipal services for more than two centuries. According to Statistics Canada, the Saint John municipal area has a population of 122,389, with a population density of 36.4 persons per square kilometre.

The Port of Saint John is one of Canada’s most important ports (its relatively mild maritime climate keeps its deep-water harbour ice-free year round when inland ports in the St. Lawrence Seaway must contend with ice). This keeps the city’s businesses and industries bustling throughout the year. In 2010 for the first time ever, the Port of Saint John exceeded 30 million metric tonnes of cargo in a single year.

About Saint John Transit

Saint John Transit was established in 1979 to provide scheduled transit service to the city. It replaced City Transit Limited (1948-1979) and a string of others dating back to the People’s Street Railway Company (1869-1876). Saint John Transit is the largest public transit system in the province, both by mileage and passengers.

SaintJohn-110617-01web

Saint John Transit bus now equipped with NextBus wireless AVL solution

Saint John Transit Statistics

Saint John Transit’s ridership is approximately 50 percent higher than the average for Canadian cities with a population of between 50,000 and 150,000.

  • Number of vehicles: 60
  • Ridership: 2.5 million riders per year

Current active fleet bus types:

Greening Saint John

Saint John Transportation Usage - 2006 Census

Source: Statistics Canada, 2006 Census of Population.

To reduce auto emissions, the City of Saint John, along with the Federal and Provincial governments, is investing in public transportation between uptown Saint John and outlying communities. Branded as ComeX (Community Express), it provides a rapid bus transport service during peak commuting times. With the implementation of ComeX, greenhouse gas emissions are projected to drop by 1,500 metric tonnes and downtown traffic will decrease by 800 vehicles a day over the next five years.

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