The Tárogató Project – Wrapping It Up

If the Tárogató Project hadn’t wrapped up with the concert (30 April 2017), then it certainly did when I submitted the final report to BC Arts Council. Doing so reminded me of all the people and events that came together (and that never would have otherwise).

About the Tárogató Project

The Tárogató Project (aka “Building a uniquely British Columbian Repertoire for the Tárogató”) was intended to commission two BC composers to each write a seven-minute piece of music for tárogató, which would build on its contemporary concert repertoire while not losing sight of its traditional folk roots.

By tying the commissions with an historical event, the project achieved far wider interest than would have been possible with only the commissions. The historical event was the 60th Anniversary of the arrival of Hungarian refugees to Vancouver, in particular about 200 faculty and students from the University of Sopron’s Faculty of Forestry. The alumni went on to have a significant impact on UBC, and forestry practices in British Columbia and the final concert was attended by several families descended from the original group.

The Project includes some notable artifacts

Listen to Arbutus by Jeffrey Ryan

Listen to I Will Stay Here by Adam Hills

Testimonials and letters: I received some importants letters of congratulations before and after the concert.

Also, I built a very cool new fingering chart for the tárogató, which is superior to anything I’ve been able to get my hands on. I offer it freely below.

Concert Programme

Big thanks to UBC’s Department of Forestry for helping to promote the concert and for coming on as a sponsor. Also, thanks to Vancity for providing some support with the concert itself. Their financial support helped St. Philip’s Church continue to offer such concerts without expending its music fund.

What I Learned

The entire process took a year and it carried with it its own joys and heartaches. I learned how hard it can be to work with musicians, many of whom function in some sort of off-the-grid pre-internet world, so arranging rehearsals was an extreme challenge. My 91-year-old mother is more reliable when it comes to responding to emails. On a brighter note, this project gave me something of great value to work at in music. It’s definitely whetted my appetite for excellence although time has worn of some of the downsides striving for excellence can bring. I understand my own perfectionist traits better and also my laziness. I’m learning on the one hand to chill out more, while on the other to quit wallowing and accept that some things require hard work to achieve.