Tag Archive for Chicago Manual of Style

Choosing a Style Guide

If you’re a writer, particular a writer where technical accuracy is important, you need a good set of standards as your reference point. Style guides establish standards and consistency and are especially useful to large organizations where many people are working together on the same project. Below is a sampling of several style guides; some are industry standards used by technical writers while others provide an insight into in-house standards used at differing organizations.

Download any you like:

  • The Chicago Manual of Style – A great resource for technical writers. There’s great information also on laying out documents according to their type.
  • Strunk & White – Elements of Style – This is still a standard even though some of the prescriptive directions seem quaint nowadays (literally).
  • Microsoft Manual of Style – Check how it describes Windows interface naming
  • Apple Style Guide (2009) – Check how it handles units of measure
  • BCIT Graphic Standards 2013 – Even images and graphics need a style guide. This graphics standard guide from BCIT is typical of this genre and of great use to anyone how wants to design a manual to represent BCIT. It includes exact descriptions of branding, logos, colours, type faces, and more.
  • WorkSafeBC Editorial Style Guide – This is a good example of a style guide used in-house by a large organization. Their treatment of how to handle jargon in writing is worth a read.
  • Vancouver Style Guide – This guide, from the University of Queensland (Australia), describes a citation standard known, apparently, by librarians as Vancouver style.
  • Canadian Press Style Guide An Overview – This excerpt from the CP style guide provides good information on how to handle (i.e., capitalize) formal titles.

Copy Editing English for a Globaliz(s)ed Audience

In one of the courses I teach at BCIT (British Columbia Institute of Technology), I received an email from a very keen participant asking how to prepare for the course (Technical Editing and Grammar course – 1008). Inspired by such enthusiasm (this is what makes September great!), I decided to take it further and include  information for anyone interested in improving their core skills as a technical writer.

Get a Quality Style Guide – Consider ordering the Chicago Manual of Style (I have both an online and hard copy version). It’s an excellent investment for anyone interested in high-quality English-language writing.

Learn MS Word – Research the Track Changes feature in MS Word. There are other software programs technical writers need for writing, but MS Word is still the most common. As a technical writer, you’re expected to use Word at an advanced level.

Learn hard copy markup – It may seem archaic, but hard copy markup makes you indispensable when editing and developing large documents).

Learn the Most Common Grammar Errors – In my course, we learn the ten-top grammar errors. Don’t feel you have to know all grammar errors (that’s what a good style guide is for), but your credibility as a writer is increased exponentially if you know the core ones. To find out the ten-top grammar errors, take my course.

Write, write, write! – to get your foot in the door, take every opportunity you can to write and edit even if it means working for free. Ensure you ask low paying (or non paying) clients to let you keep a copy of the before and finished versions, so you can use them to market yourself.